Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Hours

Norman Rockwell Museum is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:

open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thursdays: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (July/August 2015)
Rockwell’s Studio open May through October.

November – April: open daily:

Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings:

The Museum is Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

 

 

 

Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $18.00
Seniors (65+): $17.00
College students with ID: $10.00
Children/teens 6 — 18: $6.00
Children 5 and under: FREE

Official Museum Website

www.nrm.org

 

 

 

Directions

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262

413-298-4100 x 221

(0382) “You Set One Foot on This Porch and I’ll Shoot You Like a Dog”

382
“You Set One Foot on This Porch and I’ll Shoot You Like a Dog”
FES Title:
[no title entered in day books]
Alternate Titles: A Daughter of the South [1968]
Date: 05/20/1909
Size: 36″H x 24″W
Medium: oil-on-canvas
Type: illustration
Published: Stanley, Caroline Abbot. “A Daughter of the South.” The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, April 1910: 820.
caption: ‘You set one foot on this porch and I’ll shoot you like a dog.’
Inscription: ll: Frank E. Schoonover / ’09
Annotations:
Exhibitions: 1968 Clubhouse
Comments: TP 3/28/02; form 11/4/02; index; edit; relined
Commentary: After considering the first image sent by Schoonover, the Editorial Editor, R.U. Johnson of The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, wrote this letter on April 15, 1909, asking for a change:
“Mr. Gilder and I feel that while this picture of Mr. Schoonover’s is a striking one, the woman’s face and figure do not indicate the type of Southern lady which is expected in the stories of old Southern families. The story of her feminine gentleness and kindness make an effective contrast to the determination displayed in this scene. Mr. Schoonover has well expressed the determination – almost too well. Can she not be made less hard, more lovable to look upon, with more Southern high lady style of the kind that goes with the pillars – perhaps with war-time curls? We are sure Mr. Schoonover can make something very fetching.” (archives, correspondence)
Upon receipt of the letter and the painting, the artist re-drew parts of the figure of the woman and added some curls around her face. The enhanced painting was published as a half tone plate engraved by R. Barley.
Provenance: Collection of Mrs. L.G. Hagner; Clubhouse Art Gallery, Media, Pennsylvania [1968]; private collection; descended in the family to private collection
Current Owner:
2016-11-14T10:38:47+00:00