Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Hours

Norman Rockwell Museum is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:

open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thursdays: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (July/August 2015)
Rockwell’s Studio open May through October.

November – April: open daily:

Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings:

The Museum is Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

 

 

 

Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $18.00
Seniors (65+): $17.00
College students with ID: $10.00
Children/teens 6 — 18: $6.00
Children 5 and under: FREE

Official Museum Website

www.nrm.org

 

 

 

Directions

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262

413-298-4100 x 221

(2147) Garden Across Spring Run at Bushkill House

2147
Garden Across Spring Run at Bushkill House
FES Title: Garden- across spring run showing new wall & flowers
Alternate Titles:
Date: 09/27/1936
Size: 26″H x 40″W
Medium: oil-on-canvas
Type: landscape
Published:
Inscription:
[unsigned]
Annotations:
Exhibitions:
Comments: TP 9/25/03; Form; index;
conserved, relined and restretched
Commentary: This view of the Schoonover’s summer home in Bushkill, Pennsylvania, is looking across the Little Bushkill River toward the back of the house and the large garden that was planted each year behind the house. Schoonover was an inveterate gardener and diagrams of his planting plans can be found in the Schoonover archives.
In a letter dated April 24, 1986, Bruce Smith who mowed the Schoonovers’ lawn during the summers, relates this story about the artist, flowers, and color: “I remember Frank Schoonover as a gardener. On the back side of the house he had a large garden that was magnificent for all the colors in the flowers. I particularly remember one day in July or August, when the sky was deep blue, and the sun was bright. He stopped to talk to me by a long row of colorful gladiola. He pointed to a particularly bright red one and asked me if I could see, in addition to the red flower, a red aura surrounding the flower. (I couldn’t see the aura.) He then went on to describe how he could see a field of red radiating and surrounding the flower, and speculated to me that he suspected that was one of the gifts he had that helped him with his art work. The conversation impressed me and even today when I see a bright red gladiola, I look twice to see if maybe the aura will appear for me.”
For further commentary, see #646L.
Provenance: Private collection
Current Owner:
2016-11-14T10:36:35+00:00